Caring for animals in the summer

By: Extension At Your Service - Tiffanee Conrad
Contributed photo Pets and livestock animals should be provided with plenty of water on hot summer days.

The temperature has really been hot this summer! It’s important during this time for animal owners to think about how to protect their pets and livestock. You need to provide appropriate shelter against the sun and ensure they have access to cool, clean water. It is also important to consider factors such as the animal’s size, age, health and thickness of hair. Some animals are more vulnerable to hot temperatures than others. Particular care should occur with older animals that sometimes have a harder time with heat. Livestock and pets can get very overheated, dehydrated, and possibly die from extreme temperatures.

Since dehydration is such a huge risk for animals in really hot weather, pet owners need to make sure they have plenty of fresh water. Ice and/or frozen water bottles can be floated in water to cool it down. Make sure when filling water bowls up that you run the water hose a few seconds until it runs cool. You can purchase a large, heavy livestock bowl if your animals are continuously turning the dish over. Water intake during hot weather increases significantly. A 1,300-pound cow can drink 25 gallons of water on a hot day. Also, please remember that animals don’t eat as much food during hot weather.

Animals that regularly live outdoors can handle hot weather if they have proper shelter and water. They need a shelter that is tall enough to allow wind movement. Putting a tarp over a short dog pen can do more harm than good by creating a sauna-like environment. For shade, think about when your family goes to the beach all day. You need to get out of the sun for a few hours to get a break. Animals are the same way. They are way more comfortable when they have plenty of shade. They can also get sunburned just like we do.

Trees and some shrubs can provide good shade for your pets, just think about where the shade is throughout the day. You’ll also need to think about what type of trees you have. Some trees provide better shade than others because of their thick leaves and branches. Hardwood trees are normally good shade providers. Pine trees with tiny needles may not be adequate unless you have several of them bunched together.

Animals may also need fans to help them cool off. Reducing the temperature lowers animal stress, improves animal health, and increases feeding efficiency. Also, clipping their hair can really help animals. Providing a pool with cool water can help dogs to cool themselves down. If animals are panting and digging holes to cool off, they probably need your help.

Make sure to remove and kill any ticks you find on your animals, since they can cause disease and problems with anemia. Dogs and cats may also need flea pills, spray, or powder during this time. Fleas have been really rough on animals for the past few weeks. If animals are scratching, fleas are probably the culprit. They can easily be seen scurrying on the bellies of pets.

It’s also good to work animals during the morning hours when it is cooler. You can watch the weather forcast and work livestock on days that may be a little cooler if you have some flexibility. Also, when transporting livestock on trucks and trailers, its better to move them early in the morning or at night to prevent heat stress. With a few preparations, you can prevent unnecessary death in your livestock herd, increase the productivity of your operation, and keep your pets safe and comfortable.

Tiffanee Conrad is the Richmond County livestock agent with the N.C. Cooperative Extension office in Rockingham.

https://www.yourdailyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_EXT_tiffnew-1.jpg

Contributed photo Pets and livestock animals should be provided with plenty of water on hot summer days.
https://www.yourdailyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_ext_horsetrough.jpgContributed photo Pets and livestock animals should be provided with plenty of water on hot summer days.

Extension At Your Service

Tiffanee Conrad