Last updated: June 05. 2014 1:09PM - 537 Views
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HAMLET — Richmond Community College will build a public 1-kilometer fitness trail with 10 exercise stations on its campus to help students, staff and area residents stay in shape.


College trustees gave the project the green light at their Tuesday meeting. The trail will measure two-thirds of a mile, or roughly 1K, and 10 fitness stations dotting the course will allow users to do crunches, pull-ups and other exercises.


“We are looking for friends and supporters to help make this project a possibility,” said RCC President Dr. Dale McInnis. “We have a lead gift from the (G. R.) Kindley family and Mr. Kindley has secured the RCC Foundation an in-kind donation from Vulcan Materials for the stone for the trail.”


The college Board of Trustees tentatively approved a plan to name the trail in honor of Mary Ellen Kindley. The board plans to hold a formal vote on the dedication at its next scheduled meeting.


“The Kindley family has been a great partner and supporter of the college for a number of years,” said McInnis. “We are humbled to have the opportunity to work with them on this worthwhile project that will honor Mrs. Kindley.


Donations to the fitness trail project can be made by calling RCC Foundation Director Olivia Webb at 910-410-1807.


SCOTLAND SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP


In other action, the board approved a memorandum of agreement between RCC and Scotland County Schools to increase the number of career and technical course offerings through the college at Scotland High School in Laurinburg.


“This agreement lays the groundwork for where the college wants to be with both (Richmond and Scotland) school systems,” McInnis said. “We are working toward providing every student with the opportunity to earn free college credentials — up to a two-year degree — while still in high school.”


Under the new agreement, RCC will use space at Scotland High School to offer a number of technical classes in mechanical, computer and electrical engineering, computer information technology, electric utility substation and relay technology, business and other high-demand degree programs during the students’ school day.


These courses are in addition to the traditional college transfer, health care and welding courses currently offered to students in Scotland County.


“This is going to be great for the community to have students who are graduating from high school with an industry-recognized credential or degree,” said Camille Goings, Scotland County Schools’ career and technical education director. “Our students will have further skills to go out into the work force and be competitive or continue to RCC or other higher-education opportunities upon their completion of high school.”


Trustee Dr. Al Covington agreed.


“This is a win-win-win for the college, the school system and the community,” said Covington. “In addition to what this is going to do for our students it is going to bring something that is sorely needed to both Richmond and Scotland counties: jobs.”


RCC is currently looking for a full-time instructor to teach drafting and blueprint reading for the first year of the agreement. The position, starting in August, will be housed at Scotland High School.Kary Edmondson, RCC’s director of K-12 partnerships, said the Scotland agreement will require for or five new full-time RCC faculty members to teach classes at Scotland High.


TRUSTEE STEPS DOWN


Tuesday night’s meeting was the last for Trustee Jim McCaskill. A six-year veteran of the board, McCaskill is stepping down at the end of the month, as he and his wife have moved to Moore County to be closer to family.


“It has truly been a pleasure to serve as a member of this board,” McCaskill said. “I feel like we have moved the needle in a positive direction on the education of our students in Richmond and Scotland counties.”


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