Last updated: February 10. 2014 9:33PM - 2440 Views
By Amanda Moss



Peggy Covington
Peggy Covington
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Amanda Moss


amoss@civitasmedia.com


ROCKINGHAM — The candidate filing period began at noon on Monday and local officials took the opportunity to express their interest in running for office.


Four seats are to come open for the Richmond County Board of Commissioners. Each seat is a four-year term. The salary is $9,528 a year.


Republican Ben Moss is seeking reelection for his position on the board. Moss said that he has represented the residents of Richmond County to the best of his abilities during the past four years. If reelected Moss promises to continue to try and make the county an even better place to live.


“Many tough decisions had to be made, but as a board we managed to keep the tax rate the same and have some economic growth in such hard times,” Moss said.


Democrat Don Bryant is also seeking reelection for his position on the board. Bryant said he wants to continue to serve the residents of the county and that he will continue his focus on the water in the county. Bryant said it is one of the biggest assets to the county, aside from the people, and that it should be kept clean, safe and usable.


“It’s a tough economy out there,” Bryant said. “We have a good group we work with. There are a lot of things I would like to see get done and I will work to that end.”


Democrat Peggy Covington has also filed for candidacy for the board. She is a former commissioner who served on the board from 2008 to 2012. Covington was fourth among five Democratic candidates in the 2012 primary election. Covington feels her wealth of knowledge and experience in various community organizations and initiatives will allow her to help the residents in the county.


“As a Richmond County commissioner, I would strive to represent the poor, the youth and other groups who feel alienated by bringing their needs to the forefront of the political process,” Covington said.


The office of the Richmond County Clerk of Court is open. It is a four-year term.


Democrat Vickie Daniel, current clerk of superior court by appointment, filed for her candidacy on Monday and is currently the only candidate running for the position.


“As your present Clerk of Court and a 30-year veteran of the Clerk of Superior Court’s Office, appointed by Judge Tanya Wallace, I am dedicated as well as committed to continue providing the citizens of Richmond County with the best services available,” Daniel said. “It is my goal that everyone who walks through our office door be treated in a professional and respectful manner.”


The Richmond County Sheriff seat will be up for grabs. It is a four-year term and the base salary is $77,597.


Incumbent James Clemmons Jr., a Democrat, filed for reelection. Clemmons said it has been a humbling experience to be able to work for the residents of Richmond County, and that he would like the opportunity to continue to serve. In his time as sheriff, Clemmons said he has sought to improve relationships with various agencies as well as improved training, education, technology and availability to the community.


“I have an open door policy,” Clemmons said. “You don’t need an appointment to come and speak with me. We have set a standard for commitment, professionalism, honesty, integrity and trust. The seat I sit in doesn’t belong to me but to the people here.”


Richmond County has two seats for the North Carolina House of Representatives, and the seat for the North Carolina Senate, all are up for grabs. Each seat is a two-year terms and the salary is $20,700 for each position.


Democrats Ken Goodman and Garland Pierce have filed to run for reelection for the House, and Democrat Gene McLaurin has filed to run for reelection for the Senate.


Goodman is going for his third term in the House for District 66, which encompasses Richmond, Scotland, Hoke and Montgomery counties. Goodman said in a press release to The Daily Journal that he will continue to be an advocate for our public education system and statewide universities and community colleges.


“For nearly 40 years I’ve worked in a small business and in the textile manufacturing industry, I know that our future depends on an educated and skilled workforce,” Goodman said. “We cannot afford to shortchange the next generation of North Carolinians with cuts to our education systems.”


Pierce is seeking a sixth term representing District 48, which includes portions of Richmond, Scotland, Hoke and Robeson counties. The Democrat said he is running to help strengthen the economy and improve public education.


“Having served nearly a decade in the North Carolina General Assembly, I understand that North Carolina’s economic recovery depends upon producing more jobs and an educated workforce capable of competing in a 21st century global economy,” Pierce said. “I have championed investment in technical education and workforce training programs because they not only assist in putting North Carolinians back to work, but also create a business friendly environment in which companies want to invest.”


McLaurin filed for his second term to the state senate for District 25, which includes Anson, Richmond, Scotland, Stanly counties and a portion of Rowan County. McLaurin, a businessman and former mayor of Rockingham, was elected to his first term in 2012.


“I will work to increase teacher salaries to the national average, support small businesses, and support policies to create jobs for middle class families,” McLaurin said in a press release to The Daily Journal. “I will continue to work in a bi-partisan and positive manner to build bridges, reach consensus and not divide our citizens.”


The candidate filing period will end at noon on Feb. 28.


 
 
 
 
 
 
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