New students prep for Spring classes at RCC

Last updated: December 05. 2013 9:39AM - 763 Views
Lisa Rushing Richmond County Daily Journal



Lisa Rushing | Richmond County Daily JournalEarly Childhood instructor Sheri Dunn-Ramsay advises Blair Fetner.
Lisa Rushing | Richmond County Daily JournalEarly Childhood instructor Sheri Dunn-Ramsay advises Blair Fetner.
Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

HAMLET — Richmond Community College held new student orientation and early registration for spring 2014 on Wednesday afternoon at its Hamlet campus.


There was an equal split of residents from Anson, Richmond and Scotland counties in the orientation room on Wednesday afternoon. Officials highlighted important upcoming dates, such as the first day books for the spring semester will become available (Jan. 2) or the first day students can pick up their parking permits and student ID card (Jan. 3). And perhaps the most important bit of information — classes begin Jan. 6.


There were some administrative changes noted that will impact student tuition and fees. If a student needs to drop a class, they have to fill out a drop form on their own. Staff will no longer complete it for them.


RCC’s average age of a student is 27 years old, with a mix of new high school graduates and non-traditional students. Regardless of which category they fit in, officials encouraged them to choose a fulfilling path.


“Choose something you’re going to be happy with. Be realistic in choosing your major,” Scotland County Director of Student Services Marvana Rush-Wall said.


If you can’t stand the sight of blood, don’t go into nursing. If you are bad with numbers, accounting might not be a good fit.


Greg Stone, of Hamlet, is studying Criminal Justice, and hopes to graduate in 2015. He is a full-time student while maintaining a full-time job at the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company in Rockingham. His courses for the Spring 2014 semester include English and Juvenile Justice.


“Most Criminal Justice students are influenced by television,” lead professor of Criminal Justice Michael Ordway said of the students he’s advised.


The ones not influenced by television are generally seeking the thrill of law enforcement. Ordway was an officer for 26 years, and has been teaching for 16 years.


Shana Chavis of Rockingham is going to be studying accounting. She loves math.


William Brown, of Maxton, is studying to be an electrical engineer. He hopes to graduate in 2014. Brown drives back and forth to RCC on average four days a week and plans to work full-time as well.


“I like the hands-on part of the electrical work. The labs are the hardest part,” Brown said.


When asked about the difficulty of the program, Brown said “depends on how serious you are about the program.”


The dress code policy was stressed during the orientation.


“If not dressed appropriately, instructors do not have to let you in class,” Rush-Wall said.


On the list of not to wear included saggy pants, see-through leggings, short mid-drift tops, short skirts, short shorts and hats and headgear in the classroom, unless it is for a religious reason.


Rush-Wall urged the students to get in the habit of checking their student email everyday, because their instructors will send them additional assignments and directions via email only.

Comments
comments powered by Disqus


Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute