Sandhills region thinks pink: Businesses, hospitals kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month


By Melonie McLaurin - mflomer@civitasmedia.com



Melonie McLaurin | Daily Journal Braxton Faircloth and Coleman Berry dip into a bucket of pink ice cream at The Berry Patch. The vanilla-flavored frozen concoction will be available through the end of the October, and proceeds from all pink ice cream sales will benefit local breast cancer patient Sandra King Story.


File photo | Daily Journal X-ray Technologists Jeri Taylor and Kristi Scott of FirstHealth Richmond Memorial Hospital simulate the process of a mammogram.


ELLERBE — Pink vanilla ice cream is back on the menu at The Berry Patch through the end of October in a fundraising effort to benefit Sandra King Story, a local breast cancer patient, during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

“This is the third year we’ve had the pink ice cream,” said Coleman Berry.

Braxton Faircloth, who has worked at The Berry Patch for three seasons, said the pink ice cream makes a statement.

“I think it’s a good idea,” she added. “They help the community out.”

Asked about the reason behind the benefit for Story, Berry said she is a friend of his mother’s.

“This is the first year that it’s actually gone to somebody,” Berry said. “Before, it’s gone to the Clara McLean House in (Pinehurst). Then a couple of months ago, we did something for Amy Faw.”

Faw is battling a rare form of breast cancer that was diagnosed earlier this year. On June 6, more than 60 bikers representing several area riding clubs teamed up for a benefit ride for Faw that began in the parking lot near Dunham’s Sports, wove throughout the county and culminated at The Berry Patch.

“We sold the pink ice cream for a week in June,” Berry said. “We had a bunch of church groups come out, about four or five a day. Van-fulls. We sold tons of it.”

Faircloth agreed the sales were remarkable.

“We sold, I think it was nine buckets of pink ice cream just that one week,” she said. “And last year, we didn’t even sell nine buckets the whole month of October.”

“And we’ve gotten tons of donations,” Berry added.

“Yes, lots of donations in our donation box,” Faircloth said. “But we’ve actually started out good this year. We’ve already sold three buckets since Saturday.”

Berry said he suspects the reason the ice cream is more popular this year is because its sales are directly donated to someone from the community.

“People know her, and they come up here and get it because it’s going directly to her,” Faircloth said. “The same as they did with Amy.”

Berry explained that going forward, each year’s pink ice cream sales in October will be used to help a local individual battling breast cancer.

The original concept, Berry said, came from his parents.

“I don’t know for sure, but I think so many people have helped them out in the past with my brother, Jack, who is disabled,” he recalled. “They wanted to do something to give back to other people.”

Jack Berry, 15, has severe epilepsy that prevents him from being able to attend school.

Berry said people can feel confident about buying the pink ice cream, despite its unusual color.

“It’s vanilla with pink food coloring,” he said. “It tastes just like vanilla, but it just has that pink to it.”

“A lot of people think it tastes different, but it’s just vanilla,” Faircloth said. “It’s just our pure vanilla. My favorite is the pink milkshake.”

“I like it in a waffle cone,” Berry said.

OTHER EVENTS

McLeod Health Cheraw is hosting two community “Lunch and Learn” events focused on breast cancer awareness this month.

The first features Dr. David Bersinger and takes place from 12 to 1 p.m. on Oct. 7 at Matheson Public Library in Cheraw, S.C. People planning to attend should RSVP by calling 843-537-3571.

Dr. Michael Hoffman will speak at the second event from 12 to 1 p.m. Oct. 12 at Marian Wright Public Library in Bennettsville, S.C. Those planning to attend should RSVP by calling 843-479-5630.

McLeod also invites all breast cancer survivors and supporters to its first breast cancer awareness ribbon group photo session Wednesday at 11 a.m. The photo will be taken on the hospital’s lawn next to Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Scotland Cancer Treatment Center will be promoting early detection of breast cancer, according to a press release from Scotland Health Care System.

“We’re very busy promoting awareness,” said Dotti Matthews, treatment center director. “We’re providing educational activities for the community and our hospital associates, as well as planning a community ‘Pink Out Day’ to remind women that breast cancer can be cured if caught early.”

Anyone who visits the Scotland Memorial Hospital lobby between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. wearing pink on any Wednesday this month can stop by the “Pink Out” table and be treated to pink lemonade and a snack, according to the release.

Scotland Memorial Foundation will provide lunch for participants in a one-mile breast cancer awareness walk beginning at noon Oct. 28 at the W.R. Dulin Conference Center on the hospital campus. Each survivor will receive a recognition gift.

“Women creating and following an early detection plan can help find these cancers earlier, giving us the best chance for cure,” said Dr. Beth Lindsay, Duke radiation oncologist at Scotland Cancer Treatment Center.

For information about awareness events at Scotland Health Care System, call 910-291-7630.

Reach reporter Melonie McLaurin at 910-817-2673 and follow her on Twitter @meloniemclaurin.

Melonie McLaurin | Daily Journal Braxton Faircloth and Coleman Berry dip into a bucket of pink ice cream at The Berry Patch. The vanilla-flavored frozen concoction will be available through the end of the October, and proceeds from all pink ice cream sales will benefit local breast cancer patient Sandra King Story.
http://www.yourdailyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_Icecream.jpgMelonie McLaurin | Daily Journal Braxton Faircloth and Coleman Berry dip into a bucket of pink ice cream at The Berry Patch. The vanilla-flavored frozen concoction will be available through the end of the October, and proceeds from all pink ice cream sales will benefit local breast cancer patient Sandra King Story.

File photo | Daily Journal X-ray Technologists Jeri Taylor and Kristi Scott of FirstHealth Richmond Memorial Hospital simulate the process of a mammogram.
http://www.yourdailyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_PinkSunday.jpgFile photo | Daily Journal X-ray Technologists Jeri Taylor and Kristi Scott of FirstHealth Richmond Memorial Hospital simulate the process of a mammogram.

By Melonie McLaurin

mflomer@civitasmedia.com

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